Health Matters in Business, Too

Winneba Ken Kurson has been a successful actor in many different industries. He served as a successful journalist for many years. He served as an immensely successful editor in chief of The New York Observer and its associated properties, for a very substantial period of time as well. And of course, he’s had somewhat of a storied career working as a political consultant, a ghostwriter and a very highly acclaimed author of many bestselling books. But Kurson has also been very careful, delicate and strategic in maintaining an appropriate work-life balance through all his business and successes. 

With the hustle and bustle of any major commercial industrial metropolitan city like New York City, Chicago, Washington DC, and Los Angeles, there is always a feeling of a need and eagerness to delicately balance career orientation around a healthy lifestyle. For many in the business world, they are so aggressively dedicated (in a constructive way) to their professional and career pursuits, that they don’t seem to appreciate the value of their physical and emotional health while going about their daily routines. 

Ken Kurson expresses a need for there to be a greater understanding among members of society of the need to not solely orient your lives around your professional and commercial pursuits. Of course, we all need to ultimately bring home the bacon and provide our families a good living that affords them all the necessities and even luxuries that are involved in that. But there also cannot be an overemphasis on professional pursuits at the expense of one’s health.

There lies the difference; and the source of the friction between one’s professional development and the need to ensure that one is leading as healthy and balanced a lifestyle as humanly possible. But let’s first consider the array of different components to a truly healthy lifestyle. Because in no way should we limit the consideration to one’s physical health. Emotional and mental health matter too – and have grave importance to an overall calculus of the situation. 

Concerning one’s physical health, going to the gym and working out in a consistent fashion can have dramatically constructive effects on one’s physical health. But how about one’s habits when it  comes to eating. There is an obesity epidemic in our nation that gets little to no attention. Although there have been some influencers and even people of prominence in a political context who have justifiably pointed out this issue and sought to shed light on it , in our judgement it  has not gotten the attention it  deserves. 

It’s an issue that deserves to get wall to wall coverage in an effort to deter ordinary citizens from continuing to eat in unhealthy manners so that they too do not get stricken with this awful and horribly unhealthy obesity epidemic. This matter should be taken just as seriously as any other pandemic, whether the Coronavirus or anything else. Of course, beyond what you eat, let’s also not lose sight of the close parallels that exist between emotional and mental health – and they affect one’s physical health. 

The correlations are strong and the parallels are somewhat obvious and clear. So there needs to be a greater understanding of the value of engaging in a lifestyle that provides one greater mental and emotional health. There is no shame in mental health counseling and seeking it  out for instance. For too long that has been a taboo subject of sorts. And there’s no reason for that to be the case. Let’s change it , if at all possible. 

Ken Kurson advises media properties to ensure that there is greater exposure lent and afforded to the obesity pandemic; and beyond that, the grave consequences that can be had if people aren’t more cautious about what they eat, consume and the types of lives they lead. Kurson has been committed to ensuring that the status quo on this subject and topic is not maintained. For the status quo, can prove to have very destructive and even catastrophic consequences, if things are not turned around in an expeditious fashion. There needs to be a healthy rallying cry that is vocal and clear in its communications to the general public of the fact that leading a healthier lifestyle is also in the public interest. Our lawmakers should be conscious of this; and seek to spread this message to communities nationwide. Perhaps employing the use of influencers that are specially tailored given whatever the community and constituency they are catering to, would be a prudent strategic move.